Chancellor Chopp: Unburied

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Former SAE Fraternity House. Photo by Amanda Roesser.

In 2014, Rebecca Chopp made history at the University of Denver by becoming the University’s first female chancellor. However, now it seems as though she may be making a different kind of history at the University, creating what some – in particular sexual assault survivors and members of the Greek system- charge as an increasingly controversial and even questionable legacy.

Chopp has accomplished a great deal since receiving her B.A. from Kansas Wesleyan University, Master of Divinity from the St. Paul School of Theology, and her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. She has been the president of Colgate University and Swarthmore and is currently the Chancellor of the University of Denver.

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Theresa Marchetta, anchor and investigative reporter for 7News

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Theresa Marchetta. Photo by Invisible Disabilities Association.

Theresa Marchetta, a well-known investigative reporter and news anchor for Channel 7 News, has good advice for young journalists on how to excel in the field, and, more generally, in terms of the most important aspects of being a reporter.

Marchetta graduated from the University of California, San Diego, with her BA in mass communication and media studies. Marchetta is a news anchor on The Now at 4 p.m. through the Denver Channel; she has also been an anchor and investigative reporter for 7 News for the past 14 years, and is an adjunct professor at Johnson & Wales University.

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The geography of Italy: negotiating historical heritage and current political challenges

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Professor Papotti speaking at the University of Denver. Photo by Amanda Roesser.

Professor Davide Papotti spoke at the University of Denver on Tuesday, May 10, 2016, to an audience of professors, undergraduate and gradate students, and local Italians who live in Denver.

Professor Papotti was born in Naples and is an associate professor in the Geography department at the University of Padua, and the author of more than 70 scientific articles. He was brought to the University of Denver through the endowment of Italian culture at the University of Denver, which endows Italian culture, scholarships for Italian majors, and AHSS faculty research grants in Italian culture. Professor Papotti was also sponsored to come to the University of Denver through the Italian and geography and environment department.

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Trivia night at Bean’s

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Beans Cafe. Photo taken by Amanda Roesser.

Every Tuesday evening at 7:00 p.m., Trivia Night takes over Beans, the student run café on the University of Denver Campus. The normal coffee shop atmosphere of Beans becomes a raging powerhouse of emotions, competitiveness, and laughter, and only one team can come out victorious.

When I walked into the café, the sound of coffee whirring out of the espresso machines filled the beige walls and bounced off the chestnut brown round tables. The barista looked up in an acknowledging sort of way, and went back to her machines, wiping sweat off her brow and throwing her hair up into a bun. I chose the most inconspicuous seat, hoping to blend into the beige walls, while still being able to observe the unique set of University of Denver students rallied around their tables, waiting for the quizmaster to begin the evening.

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Is it too late to save the ocean?

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A group of surfers off the Santa Barbara Coast. Photo by Amanda Roesser

The ocean may not be able to hold out much longer as over 80% of marine pollution comes from land activities. According to WWF Global oil, fertilizers, garbage, sewage disposal, and toxic chemicals pollute the ocean daily; and the pollution does not seem to be stopping. The amount of pollution affecting the ocean currently, can affect what the ocean holds for us in the future, and the rest of the world’s biodiversity.

According to a survey done by the NOAA, most ocean pollution begins on land, and the biggest source is nonpoint source pollution. Nonpoint source pollution includes a plethora of small sources, but the main source is motor vehicle engines, which drop oil each day onto roads and parking lots. The oil then finds its way into the ocean, harming animals and humans.

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Is it too late to save the ocean? — amandaroesser

The ocean may not be able to hold out much longer as over 80% of marine pollution comes from land activities. According to WWF Global oil, fertilizers, garbage, sewage disposal, and toxic chemicals pollute the ocean daily; and the pollution does not seem to be stopping. The amount of pollution affecting the ocean currently, can affect […]

via Is it too late to save the ocean? — amandaroesser